Home » Cooking Tips » Campanelle Pasta Substitute

Campanelle Pasta Substitute

Quite a few varieties of pasta capture attention, like campanelle. This impressively-designed ingredient pops in any dish it’s included, which explains why many Italian recipes employ its use. Campanelle is also an exquisite addition to pasta-based dishes and can feature recipes outside Italian cuisine. But you can’t always have this exotic pasta in your pantry, which calls for the need for a substitute.

Here, we’ll offer you options to replace campanelle and highlight how they compare with the original deal. And as you go along, you’ll realize how handy these substitutes can be and the ways they help fill the void left behind by a lack of campanelle pasta.

Campanelle Pasta Substitute

What is Campanelle Pasta?

Campanelle is short pasta fashioned such that it looks like a ruffle-edged cone. Its unique shape is also reminiscent of a bellflower, so its name directly translates to ‘little bells’ in Italian. It’s also called Gigli, or handbells, mostly made from durum wheat, like most pasta. And Campanella’s unique form makes it an appealing addition to many recipes, especially those that heavily depend on aesthetics.

The shape of Campanella pasta is gentle yet sturdy, with thin, fluted edges of the petal-like design. This form allows the pasta to capture sauce and is why it’s included in such dishes. Campanelle is a member of the extensive family of short pasta, renowned for its hollow design and intricate forms.

Uses of Campanelle Pasta in Recipes

Campanelle pasta’s hollow shape makes it perfect in sauces, as it captures the fluid in its space, offering extra flavor. And it works excellently with dairy-based sauces. It’s also welcome in sauces rich in chunky vegetables like pumpkin, lentils, and artichokes and also pairs well with meat-based dishes. And because it’s great with lean proteins, you can also combine campanelle with fish and seafood.

You’ll also find campanelle in fruit-based salads, where its intricate shape adds appeal to the colorful dish. And it transfers this aesthetic advantage to any dish it’s included, which is why it features numerous gourmet dishes and exquisite dinner menus. Plus, its impressive shape is so catchy that most featured recipes are named after it. And its alluring shape and tasty blend with many food ingredients makes it a popular inclusion in recipes such as;

Substitutes for Campanelle Pasta

Campanelle is one of the most exquisitely designed pasta varieties in Italian cuisine. But it comes with a drawback. As one of the most impressive options on the market, it may not always be around you.

But never fear, as other substitutes can replace campanelle pasta in your recipes. And below, you’ll find convenient options that’ll give your dish both a captivating appearance and similar palatability.

Cavatappi

Cavatappi

This pasta has a unique corkscrew shape that reminds you of macaroni. But this doesn’t take away its aesthetic appeal, making it ideal for replacing campanelle. Cavatappi is also hollow-shaped like campanelle, meaning it’ll capture sauces and dressings, giving you a similar experience. And it works in creamy sauces, salads, and baked dishes and pairs well with meats, vegetables, and fish.

Cannelloni

Cannelloni

Cannelloni is still an easier pasta variety to find compared to campanelle, so you get a convenient option with it as a substitute. Plus, it has a long tube shape so that the hollow will hold fluids from soups, sauces, and dressings. But cannelloni works best in baked dishes, and you can find it in different sizes. Plus, you can use the larger types for stuffed recipes and fill the hollows with cheese, meats, and sauces.

Fusilli

Fusilli

Unlike campanelle, fusilli come in a twisted shape. But while it may look different from campanelle, it does share a similar texture and cooks just as fast. Fusilli is also easy to find in grocery stores, making it a convenient replacement to consider. And it works in everything, from salads to sauces, dressings, soups, and baked dishes.

Penne

Penne

Penne may not share Campanella’s unique, eye-catching design, but it offers a hollow shape that holds sauces and dressings just as well. And it’s a popular pasta type, which is regularly featured in many dishes. Penne works best in salads but can also be added to sauces and baked dishes. And for sauces, it performs best when the consistency is creamy, rich, and thick.

Rigatoni

Rigatoni

Rigatoni comes in numerous sizes, so you get options in terms of length and diameter. And it’s another common option you can find, as it features in almost anything that’s pasta-related. Rigatoni has a common tube shape, so it may not be what you expect in terms of aesthetics. But once added to sauces and dressings, it’ll still offer a compelling effect as the hollow shape easily holds liquid. You can also use rigatoni in baked dishes, and it pairs well with hearty dishes made with meat or fish.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

How long does it take to cook campanelle?

Campanelle takes about seven to 10 minutes to cook fully, regardless of what recipe it’s used in, and this makes it one of the quickest-cooking pasta varieties available.

Is campanelle vegan?

Campanelle is produced from durum wheat, making it vegan-friendly. And most varieties are also non-GMO verified. Most campanelle varieties are also nut-free and suitable for allergies and sensitivities.

What type of pasta is campanelle?

Campanelle is best described as shaped pasta, and its name is derivative of the bell-like shape it takes. It’s also a short pasta and is one of the most eye-catching varieties of the family.

Conclusion

You don’t have to toss out that pasta recipe because you don’t have campanelle. While it makes a fantastic addition to any dish, the pasta is still replaceable. Here, we’ve highlighted what makes campanelle pasta so appealing and offer replacements when you don’t have it in stock. So, when next you’re out of Gigli, give these substitutes a shot, and you’ll be pleased with the result.