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Substitute for Molasses

We use sweeteners in our daily meals as we bake, cook, and more. One of the common forms of sweeteners we use is molasses, a sweetener rich in vitamins and minerals, commonly used in baking, cooking, and brewing beer.

Substitute for Molasses

But molasses is not recommended for everyone to use and may not be easy to get everywhere that’s why looking for a substitute is crucial. Although we have incorporated molasses into our different meal recipes like baked beans and pastries, replacing it should not be impossible. There is a molasses substitute suited for any recipe in the right proportion.

Molasses Nutrition Facts

Substitute for Molasses

What Is Molasses?

Molasses is a thick brown syrup used as a sweetener in our food. It is a by-product of the sugar-making process, and it comes from sugar cane or sugar beets.

First, manufacturers break down sugar cane or sugar beets to extract the juice. They then boil down the fluid to form sugar crystals. Molasses is the thick, brown syrup leftover after they remove the crystals from the liquid.

A repeat of this process by the manufacturers produces different molasses that vary in color, flavor, and consistency.

A first boiling produces light molasses, which has the sweetest taste and is very light in color, commonly used for baking.

Dark molasses, which are thicker, darker, and less sweet, are gotten after a second boiling, used for baking, but it gives a distinct color and flavor to food.

Blackstrap molasses is gotten after a third boiling; it is said to have the most health benefits as it is the most concentrated with minerals and vitamins. It is also the thickest and darkest type of molasses with a bitter taste.

Molasses is also known as an energy-giving food, contains carbohydrates as well as minerals and vitamins.

Uses of Molasses

Molasses is used in baking and cooking food differently across the globe, primarily for its color, flavor, and ability to add moisture. In some parts of the world, it is used for its aroma.

Molasses is used in baking beans. Its consistency and high calcium content help retain the shape of beans baked over time and add a distinct flavor to them. It is also used as a syrup for pancakes, oatmeal or to add consistency to sauces, pies, bread, and other deserts.

You can find molasses being used as an ingredient in making the following.

Substitutes for Molasses

In addition to containing vitamins and minerals, molasses is very high in sugar; hence it is not best to be consumed by people with diabetes as its high sugar content is of concern; even with a diabetes-free person, moderation is advised. Sometimes we might be in the middle of preparing a meal only to discover we’re short on molasses or have someone diabetic we have to consider when making a meal, if that is you, you might want to consider our recommended molasses substitutes that share similarities in taste, consistency and

Maple Syrup

Maple Syrup

Maple syrup is a great substitute for molasses as it adds similar flavor and moisture when used in cooking or baking.

Honey 

Honey

Honey has a very similar taste but a thicker texture compared to molasses. When substituting, it should be in the exact measurement as when using molasses.

Golden Syrup

Golden Syrup

Golden syrup is a light golden syrup gotten from refining sugar. It is sweet and just as thick as molasses. With the same properties as molasses, it should be used in the same measures as molasses.

Dark Corn Syrup 

Dark Corn Syrup

Darkicorn syrup s is made from mixing corn syrup with a specific type of molasses; it has the same color and taste and is just as thick as regular molasses. It should be used in the same ratio as molasses when substituting.

Sorghum Syrup

Sorghum Syrup

This is a natural sweetener used mainly as a syrup. It has less consistency than molasses but is also of high nutritional benefit. It should be used in the same proportion as molasses.

Brown Sugar  

Brown Sugar

Brown sugar is obtained by combining granulated sugar and molasses. It is a good substitute for molasses as it has a similar taste to molasses though it is not liquid. When substituting, use ¾ of a cup of brown sugar to replace 1 cup of molasses.

Applesauce

Applesauce

Applesauce is not as sweet as molasses but provides the same moist consistency when used in preparing food. Like molasses, it is also rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants and contains fiber, making it an excellent substitute for molasses.

Yogurt

Yogurt 

Yogurt is not as sweet as molasses but has similar properties when used in cooking and baking. It is also a great source of calcium and healthy proteins. For a healthy source of yogurt, look for brands that have low or non-fat milk.

Puree Dates

Puree Dates

Dates are naturally sweet and very nutritional as they contain fiber. It is a much healthy substitute for molasses and can be used in equal measurements as when using molasses.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Is eating molasses good for you?

Yes, it is if you are diabetes-free and consume it in moderation as it contains minerals and vitamins beneficial to your body system.

What can I substitute for molasses in baking gingerbread?

Any of the following readily available to you between maple syrup, applesauce syrup, honey, yogurt, and sorghum syrup. Remember to always use in moderation as recommended.

Conclusion

Molasses is a standard brown syrup used as a sweetener known to contain minerals and vitamins. It is, however, not recommended for people with diabetes. So if you’re looking for a healthier substitute or you just ran out of supply with no chances of getting it soon. You can consider our recommended substitutes for molasses as they are all sweeteners with similar properties when used in your meals.